I am doing a 30 mile mountain bike race in 2 weeks. There will be only one water stop which will be around mile 17. They said to plan on the race taking 3-4 hours. Personally, I am hoping to do better than that, but who knows. I don’t do a lot of bike racing, or even mountain biking.
Anyway, Diamondback only has mounting screws for one bottle cage on the down tube. I wanted to fit another bottle somewhere. I considered drilling a couple holes and tapping them. I have done this before but on a steel frame bike. I didn’t think it would work as well on an aluminum frame. The other mounts have a little part brazed out to thicken the mounting hole. But I thought a hole through the regular thickness of the tube, and tapped, would likely strip out easily. Then I would be left with nothing but a couple stripped out pointless holes.
I went to the bike shop and looked for solutions. There was one bottle cage that mounted to a tube using velcro. I was a bit sceptical about how well it would stay in place as I road over bumpy roads and trails. There was another bottle cage that mounted ont he handlebars. I ended up buying this.
When I got home, I mounted the cage on my handle bars. It pushed the shifting cables out, but the bike still seemed to shift fine. But I didn’t like the bottle stick up like that. I considered trying to find one of the bottle cages that mounts behind the seat like they use on triathlon bikes. But I thought the bottles might bounce out of the cages. And they would also probably be expensive.
But then I came up with an idea. I returned the handlebar mounted bottle cage, and headed to Home Depot and bought a couple worm gear type hose clamps. When I got home I took a bottle cage that had small tabs sticking of the top and botton where the screws go through. Hard to explain, but most of my bottle have brackets on the back that the screws got through, but a couple had tabs that extended up and down. I needed these. I figured out where I wanted to mount the cage on the seat tube. I needed to make sure it was high enough not to interfere with anything, and low enough that I could get the bottle in and out. I wrapped the seat tube with a couple layers of electrical tape at the places where the bottle cage bracket with contact the frame. The tape would prevent the frame from being scratched up or marred by the bottle coge or the hose clamps. I held the bottle cage to the seat tube, and using the hose clamp, I clamped the cage to the tube by the bottom tab. I then used the other clamp to hold the cage to the frame by the top tab. It was very sturdy and will not be going anywhere on the hardest of rides.

Mountain bike 2nd bottle cage

Mountain bike 2nd bottle cage