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Continued from Part 2

Next came the section around Conesus Lake which is one of the Finger Lakes. It was about 10 miles from Lakeville to the south end of the lake. This was on the east side of the lake. This stretch was hard. The road surface was poor. The road went up and down. Not enough to be rolling hills, but enough to find it hard to get a rhythm going. As I got to the end of this road, I saw the arrow said left turn. I got around the corner and stopped. I pulled out my map. I knew I was supposed to take a right at the south end of the lake. Maybe the road went left, and then continued south farther. That didn’t make sense. I read write up, and found I was supposed to turn right, not left. I rode back, looked at the arrow, and sure enough, it was a right arrow, but some over spray at glance made it look like a left arrow.

I rode to the next rest stop which was at about 70.5 miles, and stopped for a few. There was a girl with a cowbell. I pointed out the “I Gotta Have More Cowbell” on the back of my LVM21 jersey. I got her to take a picture of me holding the cow bell. More Cow Bell!

2009 Tour De Cure

I started riding north on the west side of the lake. The road surface was better. It was defiantly more up and down. Pretty soon I was back at the rest stop in Lakeville which was now about the 79.6 mile mark. I stopped at the gas station and got another Pepsi. I ate the second half of my club wrap. I also got another bowl of the macaroni salad. I also used the rest room here. It was the rest room in the fire station, and not a porta potty.
The guy with the Cervelo P2C was here as well. I left the rest stop with him and some other guys.
I talked to the tri guy for a bit. He was training for the Lake Placid Ironman which he had done multiple times. He had an M-Dot Ironman logo tattoo on his leg. He had also done the Boston Marathon multiple times and does about 7 or 8 marathons a year. He told me about how he got his Cervelo P2C on eBay for $1300. Sweet! Awesome deal! I rode with these guys for a while. I even joined their pace line for a bit. But it was very yo yo for me. Because at times I would coast, and would be going faster than they would be going, so I would coast up along side of them till they caught up, and I would fall back in. After the next major turn, I passed them, and lost them for a while.
The next rest stop was in Lima at the 89.7 mile mark. There was a sweet downhill section coming down into Lima. I was down on my aerobars, and coasted past some road bikes. There was a white arrow indicating a left turn here I was getting ready to fly around the corner till I saw the rest stop. I slammed on my brakes and skidded to a stop. I rested my bike against the wall. There were a couple kids staring at my bike. Their father said they had never seen a bike with 4 handlebars before. The guys I had lost had caught up with me. I pointed out the Cervelo P2C to the kids and said it was a way cooler bike than mine. I didn’t stay at this stop for more than a couple minutes. I left this stop with the guys again. We rode north to Honeoye Falls. As we passed through town, I spotted a dog on the side of the road. I asked one of the guys if he wanted to race it. He said he wanted to tie a leash to it, and have it pull him to the park. I asked if he had every seen American Flyers. He said he loved that movie. I yelled out “Hey Eddie, you coming”. Him and another guy right on cue, quoted a few lines from that scene of the movie. It was hilarious. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gfv2diohUXE
There was a nice down hill section that I coasted down at over 40 mph. I lost the guys again. The hills in the last 10 miles were bigger than much of the rest of the course. But my legs were actually feeling stronger now. I was catching and passing more people now. Then there was the turn into the park. There was a guy on a road bike ahead of me. I was slowly catching him. There were a few little ups and downs. A truck passed me. Then we hit a downhill. I got down on the aerobars, and flew by the truck to come up behind the other rider. I passed him on the next uphill. There was another rider up ahead. I wanted to see if I could catch him before the finish. There were rolling hills with more up than down. I closed the distance, and then passed him to. Then there was the turn into parking lot. It was a downhill. There was another guy just ahead of me. There were signs saying slow down. Screw that. I was down on the aerobars, and flew passed this last guy, and skidded to a stop at the finish. I finished the ride in 6 hours and 55 minutes. Only about 5 hours and 45 minutes were actually on the bike. I finished faster than I did last year which was cool.
I parked my bike against a tree and made my way up to get food. Lunch was served by the Outback restaurant. I got a Caesar salad and a small steak. Yum!
I hadn’t gotten a t-shirt when I signed in, so I went back to the tent and managed to get one. I also signed up for a massage. The ladies there were funny, oohhing and ahhing over the couple of us who had done 100 miles. The massage loosened up my neck. They had a Rolling Stones tribute band playing. I watch them for a few, and then went and loaded up my car. As I was putting stuff a away, another rider was walking passed with his bike and friends/family. One of the people said “hey look, a hill!” The cycling commented “I hate hills”. I yelled over “Hills are our friends” and laughed.
I went home and took a nap. I kept thinking what it would be like to ride another 12 miles, and then to run a marathon. Hmmm… I guess I will find out less than three months.

Thank you again to my sponsors!

Continued from Part 1

Around mile 30 I was along with a group of about half a dozen guys, including a guy on a Cervelo P2C tri bike. There weren’t a lot of tri-bikes out here. I wasn’t really part of their pace line, but was hanging with em. There also a guy on a hybrid or possibly a 29 inch mountain bike. He would stand on the pedals and crank away at regular intervals. Man, that would be brutal to try to ride like that for 100 miles! Around mile 33 I saw a big sign saying Tour De Cure with an arrow. The group I was with kept going straight. I slowed and stopped trying to figure out if I was supposed to have turned. I saw a white arrow on the ground saying go straight, so I continued on. I figured out that must have been a rest stop back there. I was quite a ways back from the group now. I made no attempt to catch them. I had already planned not to try to keep up with the groups this year. Just to ride my own ride. I won’t be able to ride in a pace line at the Ironman.

2009 Tour De Cure

I ended up catching and passing the hybrid/29’er rider. He was still cranking away. I also caught and passed more single road bike riders. This would become a regular occurrence. I am guessing they were cruising along as part of groups. But when they got dropped, they were easy pickings for me. Not that this was a race.
As I approached Geneseo, there were some confusing road markings. There were some spray painted arrow indicating a left turn. But as I got to the road, there was an arrow saying go straight. Huh? Another rider had gone straight, so I continued on. There was a real left turn not far up, and we rode up a fairly steep grade through a college. I actually had to stand on the pedals. I had already ridden 40 miles, so this was work. There was a photographer here snapping our pictures. We got up farther onto a main road through the town. I was disoriented, and stopped another rider. I asked is we were still on the course, or if we had missed a turn. I knew the 100 mile course crosses itself at one point. He showed me a map, and then I knew where we were. We took off, and I passed him.
I stopped at the next rest stop which was at mile 43.7. More bananas and granola bars. I made a comment about rabbit food and asked about sandwiches. I told there would be sandwiches as the next rest stop which was in Lakeville. I got one of the ambulance guys to get a picture of me with my bike. I ate a banana and I got back on my bike, and started pedaling. I caught up with the guy who had showed me his map. I rode with him for a few talking, then I took off. My butt was sore and numb at the same time. I would shift my butt on the seat so I was sitting on different spots. This helped a little.

2009 Tour De Cure

2009 Tour De Cure

The next rest stop was in Avon, and not the Lakeville one with sandwiches. I ate a banana and a couple granola bars. I also used the porta potty. I picked up a map of the 100 mile route here. This rest stop was interesting as there were tons of people on hybrids, and a couple on a tandem. Many of these people didn’t even look very athletic. I felt a little embarrassed that all these people were ahead of me or catching up to me on my tri-bike. Until I figured out these people were from the shorter courses. Some of the courses had merged, and shared this rest stop. Okay, I didn’t feel bad anymore.
I passed a few more people on the next long stretch. I was slowly catching one guy. Then there was a down hill stretch, and a following up hill. I swooped passed him on the downhill, and began climbing. A little while later, I turned, and he was nowhere in sight.
Coming into Lakeville was a long downhill stretch. I got down on my aerobars and was able to coast for maybe half a mile or more. That was cool. Yes, this stop had sandwiches! I ate half a club wrap (cold), a bowl of macaroni salad, and some cookie dough bites. I shoved the rest of the sandwich into my pocket. I didn’t like the blue Gatorade. I rode across the street to a gas station and bought a Pepsi and filled my bottle with that. My knees were a little sore. Mostly my right one. I took a couple ibuprofen.

Continued in Part 3

A great big Thank You to those who sponsored me for this ride! I raised $565. The money goes to a great cause (the American Diabetes Association). Since most of my sponsors are from the LVM21 club, I wore my LVM21 jersey in your honor!

I got up when my alarm went off at 5:15am. I had already loaded my bike to the car the previous night, and loaded most everything else I needed as well. I got up, checked my email, and spent a little time waking up. Eventually I took a shower, kissed my wife goodbye, and headed off to Mendon Ponds Park, where the Tour De Cure would start. Check in for the 100 milers was at 6:45am, and the ride started at 7:30.
I arrived around 6:50am, parked my car, and headed for the checkin. Everything went smoothly. I turned in the couple pledges that hadn’t been online, signed a waiver, and got my numbers. There was a bib # that I would wear, and one that would go on my bike.
While my bike was still on the back of my car, I removed the aerobottle from the downtube, which I had just mounted the night before. I decided to go with the standard water bottle that I would likely be using in the upcoming half-iron and full Ironman triathlons. I mounted the cage, and filled the bottle with Diet Pepsi. I got my shoes and LVM21 jersey on, smeared myself with sunblock. Filled my jersey pockets with car key, hankys, camera, Carb Boom gel, a $20 bill in a plastic bag along with some ibuprofen. I got my mp3 player on.
I mounted the number on bike. It was size of two small bibs. There was sticky adhesive on the back. I folded it over my topbar near my seatpost. I headed down to line up.
Here is a map of the 100 mile course: http://main.diabetes.org/tdc09/05117_100_TdC_2009_MAP_rev_1.pdf

2009 Tour De Cure

2009 Tour De Cure
I wasn’t lined up long before they counted us down, and set us on our way towards 100 miles. It starts with a small up hill to the road. I joked to another rider that I didn’t know there would hills. Then I asked if it was too early to drop out. This was all in the first 100 feet.
I got maybe a half mile down the road and stopped. The number on the bike was rubbing my leg. I pulled it off, and moved it up to the front. Then I got back out on the road. I was passing people, and occasionally someone would go barreling by me. The group spread out. The roads we were riding on were not closed to traffic, so we had to stop for lights and signs. There were colored arrows spray painted in spots on the side of the road. The 100 mile course was to follow the white arrows. Different distance rides would follow other colors. But some of the arrows seemed to be left from previous years. But there were also some arrows painted in some spots that had nothing to do with Tour De Cure.

2009 Tour De Cure

2009 Tour De Cure

2009 Tour De Cure

2009 Tour De Cure

2009 Tour De Cure

2009 Tour De Cure

Around the 20 mile mark I think, the road got rough. It was like sections of the road had be washed out. I was cruising down the road at 25mph when a 2 or 3 foot wide, bike eating pothole appeared in front of me. I shouted a panicked “Crap” and managed to bunny hop over it. I managed to steer around other potholes in the area.
I has skipped the first rest stop, but stopped at the second one which was around mile 26.4. It was right behind an antique store that I visit from time to time looking for used books. My Pepsi was gone. I shook out the bottle, and filled it with Gatorade. It was this blue stuff, and diluted. I didn’t like it much. I also topped of the water in the front aero bottle. I also ate a banana and a granola bar.

2009 Tour De Cure

Continued in Part 2




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